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Posts Tagged ‘growing cucumbers indoors’

Remember our experiments last year with the indoor tomatoes?

You might recall that they were a great success in the end, and we ended up harvesting several dozen delicious toms from the plants growing in our north-facing enclosed verandah (which subsequently became known as the conservatory).

This season, Pete thought we’d try with Lebanese cucumbers. I wasn’t convinced they’d grow indoors, and if they did, that they wouldn’t take over the entire room!  Undeterred, my husband planted three seedlings into a large self-watering pot in the corner.  We had been fastidiously hand-pollinating the flowers and…

…all of a sudden…

…we had cucumbers!  I took this photo a week ago – at the time, this was our largest one. It was just 6cm (2½”) long and as thick as my finger…

There were also several tiny babies starting to develop…

Fast forward a week, and the first one had grown to a very respectable size…

The babies we had managed to pollinate were growing as well…

These plants are extremely thirsty – they’re consuming about a litre of water a day!

We picked the largest cucumber this afternoon to see how it tasted.  We were probably a little too early, as the fruit was still a touch under-ripe, but it was very nice nonetheless – extremely crunchy with a mild, fresh flavour, and not the least bit bitter (which had been my main concern).

Best of all, we were eating just picked, homegrown cucumbers at the beginning of winter.  How cool is that!

PS. In case anyone is thinking of trying this out, Pete thought we should let you know how we pollinate the plants.  We remove the male flowers, strip off the petals, and then push the little brush of stamens that remains into the female flower and give it a twist.  There isn’t a huge amount of pollen produced by the male flowers, so we usually try and repeat the process a couple of times with each female flower.  In the absence of bees and other insect pollinators, this is an essential process – the flowers we missed haven’t developed any fruit at all.

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