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Posts Tagged ‘dragon chocolate mould’

Did you know it’s National Chocolate Week in the UK?

To join in the festivities, here are some of the chocolates I’ve been playing with recently…

Maude’s daughter is a mad keen dragon buff, so I made her a flight of them for her birthday.  I used a 50:50 blend of Callebaut 811 (54% dark) and 823 milk…

There were large Lord of the Rings’ style beasties…

…and smaller Chinese snake dragons.  I love the detailing of the scales!

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This crocodile was made for a friend’s birthday, but he broke in half as he was being unmoulded – hence the join in the middle of his back.  He’s made mostly of 54% dark with a little milk chocolate added for sweetness…

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Some musical instruments for Will (who plays the saxaphone) and Bethany (who’s an accomplished pianist).  Small Man insisted that the trumpet was his alone…

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As I’ve mentioned before, I buy almost all my moulds from Candyland Crafts in the US.  The shipping to Australia is expensive, but the moulds themselves are just $1.99 each – cheap enough to splurge on a new one for each occasion. The detailing and quality are astonishing for the price.

I was placing an order for Christmas moulds and couldn’t resist picking up this 3D chef to make a gift for my friends at Chefs’ Warehouse…

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Learning to temper chocolate takes a little practice, but once you find a technique that works for you, you’ll never be caught short for a last minute gift again.

I wrote up the method I use here, but it’s a little fiddly.  If you google tempering, you’ll find easier techniques, which usually involve melting two-thirds of the chocolate and then stirring in the remainder until the right temperature is achieved.  You might also find this article  by David Lebovitz useful.  It’s all about trial and error – and in this case, all the mistakes are delicious!

Remember, getting chocolate to temper is reasonably easy, but keeping it there is tricky.  Dark chocolate needs to go into the mould while it’s between 88 – 90F (milk chocolate: 86 – 88F), but if it cools below that, it can drop out of temper and won’t set properly.  The real secret to success is to find a way to keep the chocolate at the right temperature while you work it.  I use heat mats for this purpose – I like the Australian-made ones from Shin Bio, but my friend Christina tells me that a hot wheat pack wrapped in a plastic bag works just as well.

Hope you all enjoy National Chocolate Week – and thanks to the Frugal Feeding Blog and C from Cake, Crumbs and Cooking for the headsup!

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