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Posts Tagged ‘homemade marshmallows’

It’s always a challenge at this time of year to use up our Christmas leftovers!

I combined a bowl of cold mashed potatoes with a handful of chopped ham and a couple of spring onions from the garden.  The mixture was shaped into patties and dusted with flour before shallow-frying to golden brown.

Topped with a freshly laid egg and garnished with a little backyard purslane, our homemade bubble and squeak was a great start to the day!

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We had four leftover eggwhites from the brandy custard we made to accompany our Christmas pudding.  They became a double batch of marshmallows

…which in turn became Rocky Road, with a blend of dark and milk Callebaut chocolate, pailleté feuilletine and roasted skinned hazelnuts…

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And finally, our leftover Christmas turkey and gravy became the base for a delicious turkey pie.  The pie was better than the original turkey dinner!

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How are you going with using up your Christmas leftovers?  We still have some glazed ham left, and I’ll have to get creative, as the boys are sick of eating cold sliced ham!

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In my kitchen…

…is a blue Chinese teapot that I bought for my sister-in-law Katey.  She likes her teapots to have a handle on the top, so when I saw this one at the Chinese grocery store for just $6.95, I picked it up for her…

In my kitchen…

…is a copy of Abla’s Lebanese Kitchen.  I borrowed Maude’s copy to make fattoush salad, and was so impressed that I bought my own.  It’s written by Abla Amad, legendary chef of Abla’s Restaurant in Melbourne…

In my kitchen…

…is our all-in-one Römertopf dinner.  I layered orzo and lentils with continental sausage and then topped it with pieces of confit duck…

In my kitchen…

…is a gift from my lovely friend Tezza, a Royal Albert mug based on a hundred year old design.  I’ve made the boys promise that they’ll never put it in the dishwasher…

In my kitchen…

…is a batch of our rocky road, filled with toasted almond slivers and homemade marshmallows.  I coated it in my new chocolate blend, and it’s very moreish…

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Tell me, what’s happening in your kitchen this month?

If you’d like to do an In My Kitchen post on your own blog, please feel free  to use this format, and to leave a comment here linking back to your post.  We’d all love to see what’s happening in your kitchen every month too!

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In my kitchen…

…are gifts from my lovely friends and fellow bloggers, Deb of Bagni di Lucca and Roz of Taste Travel.  Deb sewed this beautiful bag for me (it’s her own design, and she even matched the card to it!) and Roz sent me her vintage Römertopf cookbook…

In my kitchen…

…are homemade marshmallows, and cranberry and toasted almond rocky road, made with the aforementioned marshmallows and Callebaut 811 chocolate…

In my kitchen…

…are brochures from a new installation at the Art Gallery of NSW.  The terracotta warriors were created over 2000 years ago under the realm of China’s first emperor.  For anyone in or visiting Sydney in the next couple of months, the exhibition will be on display until March 13 and is well worth a visit…

In my kitchen…

…are a couple of bulbs of roasted garlic – the large one is from Di and Ian, and the little one was grown in our backyard.  After this photo was taken, the pulp was squeezed out into a bowl, mixed with a little salt and covered with oil – the roasting turned the garlic mild and mellow, perfect for smearing on toast and meats (thanks to clever Joanna for this wonderful suggestion!)…

In my kitchen…

…is a stick of butter, one of two made from more than half a litre of old heavy cream leftover from Christmas…

In my kitchen…

…is a box of golden chocolate chip cookies, baked for me by Big Boy’s best mate Tim. He dropped them over, still warm from the oven, so I’ve laid them out on a rack to cool.  I can’t tell you how happy I was to receive these!

In my kitchen…

…are jars of Pete’s latest jams – cherry and strawberry, and mango and lilly pilly…

In my kitchen…

…are treasures from our first visit to Alfalfa House in Enmore. Below are coral rice and purple jasmine rice, both from Thailand, organic peppermint tea from Egypt…

…organic maple syrup from Canada and organic rapadura sugar from Columbia. The rapadura is amazingly flavoured – it’s made from dehyrated unrefined sugar cane juice…

Tel me, what’s happening in your kitchen this month?

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This is my 12th monthly “In My Kitchen” post.
Thanks for spending the past year in my kitchen with me!

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I watched the gorgeous Annabel Langbein making marshmallows on her new show, The Free Range Cook, and couldn’t resist trying them out!  We adapted her recipe and this one by Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall to come up with our own version.

These moreish morsels only have four ingredients – sugar, gelatine, vanilla extract and egg white. The texture is reminiscent of a firm meringue pie topping – quite different from the commercial versions which are bouncy and rubbery (and made in a very different way).  These have a lovely old world charm to them.

Make sure you allow plenty of time for the mix to set before cutting – the marshmallows will continue to firm up over the next day or so.  Instead of greasing and dusting the pan, we lined it with a sheet of parchment, which was then lightly sprayed with oil.  The  finished sweets then only needed a light dusting of cornflour (cornstarch) and icing sugar to keep them from sticking together.

  • 2 large free range egg whites (as fresh as possible)
  • 500g (2¼ cups) white sugar
  • 250ml (1 cup) water
  • 25g (0.88 oz) leaf gelatine (see Hugh’s recipe if you’re using powdered gelatine)
  • ½ teaspoon of vanilla extract (we used homemade)
  • mixture of cornflour (cornstarch) and icing sugar, for dusting

1.Line a rectangular baking tray with parchment paper, and lightly spray the top of the paper.  I used a 33cm x 22cm (13″ x 9″) roasting tray.

2. In a medium saucepan with a long handle, stir the sugar and water over a low heat until the sugar dissolves, then raise the heat and bring to a rapid boil.  Clip on a candy thermometer and boil the syrup until it reaches hard ball stage (122C/252F).  This will take approximately 10 – 15 minutes.

3. Soak the gelatine leaves in a bowl of cold water for about 10 minutes.

4. Before the syrup reaches temperature, place the egg whites in the bowl of a sturdy stand mixer and beat until stiff peaks form.  Timing is quite important, and the sugar syrup, egg whites and gelatine need to be ready at the same time.  It helps, but isn’t essential, to have two people on the job – one to watch the syrup thermometer and the other to prepare the other ingredients.

5. Once the syrup is at the right temperature, remove the saucepan from the heat.  Turn the mixer on to low, and gently trickle the hot syrup into the stiff egg whites, beating constantly as the mixture turns creamy. Please be very careful – the sugar syrup is blindingly hot!

6. As soon as all the syrup is added, quickly remove the gelatine from the water and squeeze out the excess water from the softened leaves, then add the gelatine to the mixing bowl while the mixture is still hot, and beat until combined.  Add the vanilla extract and continue beating.

7. Turn the speed up and beat the mixture until it thickens – Annabel suggests beating until the mixing bowl feels just warm – this can take up to 10 minutes.  The finished mix will be very thick but still pourable (even thicker than photo below).

8. Scrape the marshmallow into the prepared pan and smooth out the top.  Leave to set for at least four hours or overnight.  When firm, lift the slab out using the parchment paper, cut with a warm, dry, sharp knife into squares, and dust each with a fine coating of cornflour (cornstarch) and icing sugar mixture.

Of course, once we had homemade marshmallows, we had to make dark chocolate rocky road!  We used 500g  of tempered dark Belgian chocolate, 125g slivered almonds and 200g of homemade marshmallows, chopped into cubes.  It’s wickedly good!

Click here for a printable version of this recipe

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