Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘microwave custard’

We always make friands and custard at the same time – the friand recipe uses four egg whites and the custard uses up the yolks.

Last week Pete asked me to make friands with a leftover tin of peaches that we’d uncovered in the pantry. The result was a delightfully gentle and subtle cake – quite different from the berry and chocolate version we usually make.

The peaches should be cut into small pieces – probably smaller than the ones below..

  • 100g unsalted butter, melted and cooled
  • 4 large egg whites
  • 45g plain flour
  • 140g icing sugar mixture (or plain icing sugar)
  • 85g almond meal
  • 150g diced tinned peaches, drained in a sieve to remove excess syrup

1. Preheat the oven to 190C or 175C with fan.  Sit six sturdy cupcake liners on a tray and spray the insides of them lightly with oil.  Alternatively, use a friand pan or muffin pan.

2. In a separate bowl and using a coarse sieve, sift together the flour, icing sugar and almond meal.  I’ve found that sifting all three results in a lighter texture, but if you’re feeling lazy, just sift the icing sugar and stir it together with the flour and almond meal.

3. In a separate mixing bowl and using a hand whisk, beat the egg whites for about a minute until they’re frothy, but not stiff.

4. Quickly but gently fold in the dry ingredients, then add the cooled melted butter. Stir until just combined. Add the diced peaches to the mixture and stir gently to incorporate.

5. Spoon the mixture evenly into the six paper liners. Bake for 25 – 30 minutes, rotating the tray once during the baking time.  The finished friands will be well risen and  golden brown in colour. Allow to cool on a wire rack before serving with a dollop of microwave custard (recipe below).

. . . . .

I know I post my microwave custard recipe all the time, but then again, I make it all the time.  Here it is again, to save anyone having to search for it…

  • 2 cups (500ml) full-cream milk (I used UHT)
  • 1 tsp homemade vanilla extract
  • 4 egg yolks (from 59g eggs)
  • 1 Tbsp (4 tsps) cornflour (cornstarch)
  • ⅓ cup (70g) caster (superfine) sugar (or substitute vanilla sugar for the sugar and extract)

1. In a large pyrex mixing bowl, whisk together the milk, extract, cornflour and caster sugar until smooth. Microwave on high for 2 minutes until hot (my microwave is 1100 watts).

2. In a separate bowl, whisk the egg yolks until smooth. Pour the egg yolks through a sieve into the bowl of heated milk, whisking constantly as it ribbons into the hot mixture to ensure it doesn’t curdle.

3. Heat the eggy milk in the microwave on high for 1 minute, then whisk.  Heat for another 30 seconds, then whisk again.  Continue heating in 30 seconds bursts, whisking well after each, until the custard has thickened to your liking. Use immediately, or refrigerate until needed, with a piece of clingfilm pressed to the surface to stop it skinning.

Click here for a printable version of this recipe

Read Full Post »

My friends Mark and Bruce at Real Food Has Curves create some truly delicious recipes.

In the past I’ve blogged about their Paris-Brest ring, baked numerous batches of their figgy rolls, and eaten copious quantities of their caramelized leek tabbouleh.  Mark’s recent Apricot Rhubarb Crisp inspired me to make a version using the frozen berries we’d bought in Marrickville recently.

The great thing about this recipe is its simplicity – the topping comes together with a stir (because it uses nut oil instead of butter), and the fruit is simply chopped and combined.  It’s so easy, in fact, that I’ve made it twice in the past week – once to try it out, and then a second time as a dinner party dessert.

My version is sweeter than Mark’s, and uses hazelnuts instead of pecans in the topping.  I was excited to discover blanched roasted hazelnuts at Southern Cross Supplies – in the past I’ve avoided buying hazelnuts because I couldn’t be bothered skinning them.  I know it’s not a difficult process, but it  makes such a mess!

Topping:

  • 60g plain (AP) flour
  • 45g rolled oats
  • 70g brown sugar
  • 60g chopped blanched hazelnuts
  • 60g hazelnut oil
  • 30ml maple syrup
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • pinch fine sea salt

Note: I used my scales to weigh out the ingredients, but Mark also has cup measures listed in his post.

1. Combine all the topping ingredients in a large bowl and stir until evenly moistened.  Preheat oven to 175C with fan.

2. Fill a large roasting pan (I used my new Emile Henry dish) with an assortment of chopped fruits and berries – I used some of our new season rhubarb, about 500g of frozen berries, four peeled and chopped Bilpin Pink Lady apples, and some frozen cherries that I found in the freezer.

3. Sprinkle a tablespoon of cornflour over the fruit and sweeten with some plain or vanilla sugar, then stir gently to combine.

4. With your hands, crumble the topping over the fruit. It won’t cover the fruit completely, which is fine, because the topping is quite rich and needs a fair bit of fruit to balance it out.

5. Bake for 35 – 40 minutes, until the fruit is bubbling and the topping is, as the name suggests, crisp.

We accompanied ours with microwave custard, and the batch served six adults, with leftovers.

PS. I forgot to mention that this is a great do-ahead dessert.  I baked the one below mid-afternoon, and then left it on the bench until evening.  It only required a few minutes in the oven to reheat!

Read Full Post »

We adore friands.

I haven’t made them for quite a while, as I managed to kill my non-stick friand pan, but decided to try them again recently with these cute little cupcake liners I found in the pantry.

The liners have been in the cupboard for ages because, truth be told, I don’t really like cupcakes.

Friands on the other hand, are delectable, moreish and incredibly addictive.  Pete and Big Boy love them, so a batch of six rarely lasts more than a day in our house.

Inspired by the abundance of frozen fruit in the freezer, I’ve adapted the blueberry friand recipe at Exclusively Food to use raspberries and dark chocolate instead.

  • 100g unsalted butter, melted and cooled
  • 4 large egg whites
  • 45g plain flour
  • 140g icing sugar mixture (or plain icing sugar)
  • 85g almond meal
  • 80g frozen raspberries
  • 50g dark chocolate callets (I used Callebaut 70%)

1. Preheat the oven to 190C or 175C with fan.  Sit six sturdy cupcake liners on a tray and spray the insides of them lightly with oil.  Alternatively, use a friand pan or muffin pan.

2. In a separate bowl, sift together the flour, icing sugar and almond meal.  I’ve found that sifting all three results in a lighter texture, but if you’re feeling lazy, just sift the icing sugar and stir it together with the flour and almond meal.

3. In a separate mixing bowl and using a hand whisk, beat the egg whites for about a minute until they’re frothy, but not stiff.

4. Quickly but gently fold in the dry ingredients, then add the cooled melted butter.  Stir until just combined.

5. Reserve six raspberries, then add the remaining raspberries and chocolate and stir very gently into the batter – you don’t want to break all the raspberries up.

6. Spoon the mixture evenly into the six paper liners and then top each with a reserved raspberry.  Bake for 25 – 30 minutes, rotating the tray once during the baking time.  The finished friands will be well risen and  golden brown in colour.

7. Allow to cool on a wire rack before serving with a hot cup of tea!

. . . . .

And…waste not, want not…turn the four leftover egg yolks into custard in just a few minutes in the microwave!  I posted this original recipe a couple of years ago, but here it is again, this time using all milk instead of milk and cream:

  • 2 cups (500ml) full-cream milk (I used UHT)
  • 1 tsp homemade vanilla extract*
  • 4 egg yolks (from 59g eggs)
  • 1 Tbsp (4 tsps) cornflour (cornstarch)
  • 1/3 cup (70g) caster (superfine) sugar*

* Instead of the extract and caster sugar, I used vanilla sugar this time.

1. In a large pyrex mixing bowl, whisk together the milk, extract, cornflour and caster sugar until smooth.  Microwave on high for 2 minutes until hot (my microwave is 1100 watts).

2. In a separate bowl, whisk the egg yolks until smooth.  Pour the egg yolks through a sieve into the bowl of heated milk, whisking constantly as it ribbons into the hot mixture to ensure it doesn’t curdle.

3. Heat the eggy milk in the microwave on high for 1 minute, then whisk.  Heat for another 30 seconds, then whisk again.  Continue heating in 30 seconds bursts, whisking well after each, until the custard has thickened to your liking. Use immediately, or refrigerate until needed, with a piece of clingfilm pressed to the surface to stop it skinning.

Click here for a printable version of these recipes

Read Full Post »

P1050519

I’ve been experimenting with adding different flavours to our basic ice cream recipe.  My current favourite is a very alcoholic rum and raisin, the perfect ice cream to share with neighbours because  they can walk home. I’m not exaggerating, one batch I made had half a standard drink in every serve!

I bought some wonderful black rum at Chef’s Warehouse in Surry Hills – it’s 54% alcohol by volume, which I think makes it 110 proof. It worked very well with the Australian black raisins I found at the markets a few weeks ago.

Soak (marinate? macerate?) the raisins in the rum overnight (or longer) until they’re plump and swollen.  I usually fill a small jar with raisins and rum and leave them on the shelf until I need them for a recipe.  Or sometimes I just eat them neat – which is not a good idea too early in the day, as it impacts on my productivity.

icec 028

Next, make some microwave custard. Allow this to cool in the fridge. Once cold, whisk in half a cup of cream (see vanilla ice cream recipe here), then add the raisins and their soaking liquid, and pour into the ice cream maker to freeze.

icec 033

icec 038

Scoop the softly set ice cream into plastic containers, label with an appropriate warning, then freeze until firm.  Because of the alcohol, this mixture never freezes rock hard, making it just a little too easy to eat straight from the freezer!

Read Full Post »

040709 006

We’ve had a wonderful day at Lynda’s place – catching up with old friends, laughing and eating ludicrous amounts of food.  My contributions were these swirly meringues, a chocolate slab cake, a large tray of party pizza, and a sherry trifle.

The meringues were based on my old recipe, using up the four egg whites left over from the trifle. After the batter was prepared, I dipped a wooden skewer into a tiny bit of red food colouring and swirled it through the uncooked meringues just prior to baking.  The little girls found these irresistible!

. . . . .

040709 018

Sherry Trifle was an Aussie party staple in the 60s and 70s.  Judging by the response we had today, I think it’s well overdue for a comeback!  Pete commented that everyone ate this until they were sick, which (and I admit this is a little pathetic) made me deliriously happy.  Trifle is the Australian equivalent of an Eton Mess, although arguably healthier given the fruit and egg components.

It was a perfect vehicle for our new microwave custard recipe, as well as a way to use up the mini pound cakes I’d stashed in the freezer after Dan’s birthday.  Here are some loose instructions – it’s a recipe which can be easily adapted to your ingredients at hand. The quality of the custard is important and the microwave version is so easy that there’s really no need to resort to custard powder!

  • Leftover pound cake (I think you could probably use Saviordi biscuits if you preferred)
  • Sherry
  • 1 batch of microwave custard
  • ½ vanilla bean (optional)
  • 1 cup heavy cream (35%), whipped
  • Canned sliced peaches, drained
  • 2 packets of red jelly crystals
  • Meringues, roughly crushed
  • 1 cup heavy cream (35%), extra
  • Vanilla syrup (optional)

Preparation:

1.  Make up the jelly and set it in a wide flat container in the fridge.  Cut the chilled jelly into cubes.

2. Make the microwave custard, adding the scraped seeds from the half vanilla bean into the milk and cream before heating.  When the custard is ready, allow it to cool in the fridge, with a sheet of clingfilm pressed to the surface, to stop a skin forming.

3.  When the custard is cold, fold in the whipped cream.

4.  Whip the extra cream with a little vanilla syrup (optional) and set it aside for decorating the finished trifle.

Assembly:

1. Break the pound cake into pieces.  In a large glass bowl, place a layer of cake pieces and sprinkle with a little sherry.  Add a handful of crushed meringue.

2. Top with a layer of custard cream, then a layer of peaches.

3. Top with another layer of cake pieces, sprinkled with sherry, and a handful of crushed meringue. Follow this with a layer of custard and then a further scattering of peaches.

040709 012

4. Continue layering until the bowl is nearly full, ending with a layer of custard.  Tumble the jelly cubes over the top, and finish with the reserved whipped cream.  Cover with clingfilm and store in the fridge until ready to serve.

040709 014

040709 025

Lynda’s gorgeous husband Chris was a big fan of this trifle.  Chris, if you’re reading this, the leftovers are in your fridge waiting for you – hopefully you’ll find them before the kids do!

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: